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In the News

HOW SNEEZE PARTICLES TRAVEL INSIDE AN AIRPLANE

Dan Spengler

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At first, the video displays the virtual insides of a crowded passenger airplane. Then all of a sudden, one of the passengers seated in the middle "sneezes." Hundreds of multicolored particles are jettisoned into the air, creating a rainbow-speckled cloud that lingers above everyone’s heads. The cloud dissolves, and the particles disperse, making their way to the unlucky few seated adjacent to the sick passenger.

By the end, the particles have spread all over the cabin, but it's the people seated to the left and to the right of the "sneezer" who are at the highest risk of infection.

Read More...

WHY SHOULD I WEAR A TUTEM MASK WHEN I TRAVEL?

jody vitelli

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While illness can strike any time and anywhere, travel - especially holiday travel - makes us more susceptible to sickness. This is the time people are typically more stressed, exhausted, cold and are spending extended amounts of time in close quarters on planes, buses, trains and cars with lots of other people.

If you are sick, it is best to not travel for your own sake and for the sake of those around you. But if you must, a personal mask is a responsible travel accessory to help prevent spreading your germs.

Pick up a Tutem Mask when you book that ticket!

WHO NEEDS TO WEAR A PERSONAL MASK?

jody vitelli

TRAVELERS – particularly on air travel and international

COMMUTERS - public transportation

MOMS/KIDS – particularly with day care and school exposure to germs

CARETAKERS – family members and health aides who are in contact with vulnerable populations like children, the elderly and those with suppressed immune systems

WEST COAST/URBAN ASIAN POPULATION – might have trouble finding similar product in US in mass market

GERMAPHOBES – particular in urban populations with exposure to density

EVERYBODY 

Convinced? Curious. See check out our designs here or give us an idea for a new look. 

IS WEARING A MASK IN PUBLIC EVEN DOING ANYTHING?

jody vitelli

The CDC, MAYO CLINIC and many physicians recommend wearing a surgical mask in public during cold and flu season, or whenever you are sick. (See: big box of masks in the waiting room, ER, etc.)

Wearing a mask when you are infected with a cold or the flu helps contain infected germs from entering the air and infecting non-infected people. Wearing a mask during cold and flu season if you are not infected with an illness helps protect you from inhaling airborne germs carrying the flu virus or cold cooties.

So whether you are sick, or not, wearing a personal mask is an easy, responsible way to help prevent the spread of germs during cold and flu season. 

WHY DO THEY WEAR SURGICAL MASKS IN ASIA?

jody vitelli

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There are a number of reasons that people in Asia often wear surgical face masks, primarily to keep others from getting sick. The Asian culture is still steeped in respect for others and the community.

It’s common to see people in masks:

  • to help prevent the spread of germs
  • in heavy pollution
  • as a fashion statement
  • due to shyness
  • just for fun

 If anyone else knows more than we do, let us know. 

ISN'T WEARING A FLU MASK OR A TRAVEL MASK A LITTLE WEIRD?

jody vitelli

Here are ways to quiet the inner voice telling you “wearing a mask is weird!”:

  1. Remind yourself you are doing the right thing and maybe it’s your shoes or a weird hair day that’s causing looks from others.
  2. Pick a mask design to compliment your favorite coat, outfit or where you’re going.
  3. Know that spreading your contagious germs on people is weirder! They will thank you later.
  4. Think about other “weird” things we do in public. There was a time that wearing a bike helmet, picking up after your dog or even wearing a seatbelt was weird.
  5. … But what’s really weird is sneezing all over a stranger.
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WHERE SHOULD I WEAR A MASK?

jody vitelli

Wearing masks can help stop the spread of germs. Here are some places to put Tutem masks on and keep germs on the outs. 

  •  At the first sign of getting sick. You are contagious usually before you even know it in most cases. Especially during the first 24 hours of coming down with the flu, doctors and the CDC recommend you stay home and avoid close contact with others, Tutem Masks provide a way to help KEEP IT TO YOURSELF if you can’t entirely isolate yourself.
  • During cold & flu season on planes, trains and public transportation: Anyone infected with a cold or flu virus can infect those in a 6-foot radius of their cough or sneeze! Surgical or personal masks are designed to create a physical barrier to help protect other people from infection.
  • Around newborns and babies: Children under age 2 have a higher risk of developing complications if they get the flu. The flu vaccine is not approved for children under 6 months old. This means, you should take extra precaution if you have flu-like symptoms around babies.
  • If you are visiting your parents, grandparents or will be around elderly: The immune system weakens as you age, adults age 65 and older are more prone to the flu. Flu.gov notes that more than half of all flu-related hospitalizations occur in people 65 and older.
  • During allergy season: Keep your sniffles, sneezes and coughs contained during heavy allergy season and avoid spraying others with your germs or the urge to wipe your nose and cover your mouth with your hands, those around you will thank you later.
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HOW IS THE FLU DIFFERENT FROM A COLD?

jody vitelli

The flu and the common cold are both respiratory illnesses but they are caused by different viruses. Because these two types of illnesses have similar flu-like symptoms, it can be difficult to tell the difference between them based on symptoms alone.

In general, the flu is worse than the common cold, and symptoms such as fever, body aches, extreme tiredness, and dry cough are more common and intense. Colds are usually milder than the flu. People with colds are more likely to have a runny or stuffy nose. Colds generally do not result in serious health problems, such as pneumonia, bacterial infections, or hospitalizations.

Here’s a breakdown of these two common illnesses:

COLD:

  • There are more than 100 different viruses that can cause a cold
  • A cold is a milder respiratory illness than the flu
  • Cold symptoms can make you feel sick for a few days to a week
  • During the first 3 days you are contagious with a cold
  • Cold symptoms...
    • Usually begin with a sore throat (1-2days normally)
    • Runny nose, congestion
    • Cough
    • Sneezing
    • Fever is less common but possible (more likely in children)
  • Colds are often mistaken for allergic symptoms, hay fever and/or sinus infections


FLU/INFLUENZA:

  • There are only virus type A, B and C that can cause the flu
    • Virus type A & B are responsible for large flu epidemics
    • Virus type C is more stable and causes milder flu symptoms
  • Flu symptoms can make you feel sick for a few days to weeks
  • Flu symptoms are usually more severe than cold symptoms and typically include:
    • Sore throat
    • Fever
    • Head and body aches or muscle soreness
    • Congestion
    • Cough (sometimes sneezing)
    • Extreme exhaustion
  • Flus can result in serious health problems like pneumonia and hospitalization and can be life-threatening
  • There is a flu vaccine available

Tutem masks help prevent the spread of cold AND flu germs. Put one on and keep it to yourself!

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WHAT ARE THE BEST WAYS TO HELP PREVENT SPREAD OF FLU?

jody vitelli

These everyday preventative actions can help protect you and others from the spread of germs that cause the flu:

  1. Get a flu vaccine.

  2. Avoid close contact with sick people
  3. If you are sick or feeling flu-like symptoms stay home until your fever is gone
  4. Always cover your nose and mouth when you cough or sneeze
  5. Wash your hands often and avoid touching your eyes, nose and mouth
  6. Clean and disinfect surfaces and objects often during high flu season

  7. Wear a Tutem mask when in public to help prevent the spread of germs

 

HOW WILL A TUTEM MASK HELP PREVENT THE SPREAD OF FLU?

jody vitelli

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Human influenza (aka: the flu) is an airborne disease, transmitted from person to person.  Most experts think that flu viruses are spread mainly by droplets made when people with flu cough, sneeze or talk. These droplets can land in the mouths or noses of people who are nearby or possibly be inhaled into the lungs. The CDC notes that anyone within a 6-foot radius of a contagious person’s cough or sneeze is susceptible to influenza infection. People infected with the flu may be able to infect others beginning 1 day before symptoms even develop and up to 5-7 days after becoming sick. 

One of the recommended ways of preventing the spread of the flu and other respiratory illness is the use of personal face masks by those infected to help contain infected sneeze and cough secretions and limits the exposure to others.

Tutem Masks performed up to a healthcare standard in three air filtration trials, see the details here